SHARE THIS PAGE:

Kevin Knight on SiriusXM Radio Busted Open w/ David LaGreca:

On Demand Special "History of Pro Wrestling at Meadowlands Arena"

   


  

 

Kevin Knight Interview on High Spot Podcast w/ Jersey Wrecking Crew

 


  

 

Kevin Knight on Understanding The Law Business Podcast w/ Peter Lamont

 


 

Kevin Knight Interview

The Wrestle Hub (@TheWrestleHub)

Newcastle Upon Tyne, England

WWE Superstar Darren Young visits IWF Wrestling School 

Posted: June 2017 

 

How would you say you got into the business and is it something you have always wanted to do?

It was in 1996, I was working as a radio station sportscaster in New Jersey and the NWA (National Wrestling Alliance) came to town and they used me as a ring announcer a few times.  I was a foot taller than most of the wrestlers so that lead to my first match on May 19, 1996 against Rik Ratchet in Nutley, NJ.  My original aspirations were to learn as much as possible about all aspects of the business and be the best I could be in all areas.

 

What would best describe your style?

I have a very straight-forward style and it’s the one that wins matches and one the fans pay money to see.

 

Who would you turn to for advice? Either in the wrestling world or normal life?

Legendary WWE Trainer Dr. Tom Prichard, WWE Legend Honky Tonk Man, and Rik Ratchet, who was the man that originally trained me in wrestling

 

As a wrestler or a fan what’s your best wrestling moment? Or both?

It was June 24, 2003 against A-Train at WWE SmackDown in Madison Square Garden in New York City.  Not many people can say they wrestled in Madison Square Garden, and I was privileged enough to do accomplish that.  As a fan, it would be as a kid attending my first few WWE Live Events at the Meadowlands Arena in East Rutherford, NJ.

 

Who would be your dream opponent in the ring?

Can I pick four?  It would be Ric Flair, Barry Windham, Tully Blanchard and Arn Anderson.

 

And what's your dream venue to wrestle at?

I already wrestled in Madison Square Garden in 2003, so my dream was accomplished early on.

 

The UK scene is hot, especially after the UK championship, Is there anyone in the UK that you want to face?

I think Finn Baylor, Sheamus and Davey Boy Smith Jr. are great,

 

5 years from now where do you want to be?

On a beach relaxing with my feet up!

 

Which wrestler from anywhere in the world do you see going far? Either established or up and coming talent?

I still think that WWE Superstar Darren Young as a lot to offer and his best days are still ahead of him.

 

Do you have a message for your UK fans?

The UK has always had a loyal wrestling community and I thank everyone there for their support over the years.

 

You’re a 7-time IWF champion. Who do you see as a future multi-time IWF champion that is in the ranks at the moment?

I think Heartless Hellraiser Dracko, First-Class Justin Adams, and Southside Slugger Tony Graves have a bright future.

 

Your career has been amazing with all the matches against top stars but who did you enjoy working with the most?

There are a few, but on top of the list is Fifth-Element Roman Zachary.

 

IWF is getting bigger and bigger.  Why do you think that is?

We have a loyal local fanbase in New Jersey, as well as tremendous support from fans across the USA and overseas who enjoy seeing tomorrow’s superstars today,

 

As head trainer at IWF Wrestling School since its inception in 1999, you've trained such notables as WWE Raw and NXT star Darren Young, WWE-FCW rookie "Real Deal" Flex Freeman, WWE/FCW rookie Fady The Bull, TNA's Robbie E, and former WWE Diva Dawn Marie. What’s the one thing you always advise trainees to do?

Have a positive attitude, help others, be respectful, be on time, stay in shape, work hard, and if you don't have a passion for professional wrestling then you need to find something else to do.  It's all about desire, dedication and hard work.  If you don't have a true passion for this, you will fail.

 


         

Kevin Knight Interview
Indy Wrestling Life Spotlight
by Jim Henson
Master of Chaos Kevin Knight
Posted: October 2016 
 
  
What's your Wrestling Name?  Master of Chaos Kevin Knight
 
How long have you been in the business? 17 years full-time, and 21 years overall.

What made you want to get into the business? I knew I would be successful at it.  Maybe I was naive in thinking that at the time, but I knew I would be successful.  It took a lot of time and effort, but I sought out and learned from some of the greatest Legends and Hall of Famers wrestling has ever known. 

Where did you learn to wrestle? From Rik Ratchet in 1996 to 1999, who was an amazing wrestler with an amazing personality from the Northeast independent scene.  Then from 1999 to current day at IWF Wrestling School where WWE Legends and Hall of Famers were brought in to provide instruction and host training camps and seminars, like Dr. Tom Prichard, Honky Tonk Man, Tito Santana, John Brawshaw Layfield, Bushwhacker Luke, Ricky Steamboat, Jim Powers, Rip Rogers, etc.

Why do you want to be a wrestler?  I knew I could make a living doing it.  Otherwise, why get involved?  

What are your signature moves?  Anything that can help me win a match!  I don't do "moves."

What are your finishers?  Anything that will get me a 3-count!

What promotions have you wrestled for?  Too many to list.

What injuries have you sustained?  You name it, I've sprained, bruised or broken it, but I have rarely missed any matches.  Tape it up and go!

Are you mainly considered a face or a heel?  I am considered a wrestler, and I let the fans decide.

Who are the indy wrestlers you look up to?  Why?  None.

What are your favorite promotions to work for?  IWF.

What style do you do?   Are you a high flyer?   Are you old school? The style I do is the one that wins matches and one the fans pay money to see.

Tell us about your first match.  Describe it as best you can remember, from the moment you arrived the minute you left.  It was May 19, 1996 against Rik Ratchet.  It went by so fast, I don't really remember being out there, other than there was an early season heat wave and it was held outside on a baseball field and it was 98 degrees and humid.  Other than that, it's a blur but that's where it all started 20 years ago.  

Tell us about your most memorable match.  Who was it against?  Why did it make such an impression on you?  Is the match available for us to share on our site.  If so, can you provide a link?  It was June 24, 2003 against A-Train at WWE SmackDown in Madison Square Garden in New York City.  Not many people can say they wrestled for WWE in Madison Square Garden, and I was privileged enough to do so.  It was an honor.  

What do your friends and family think of you wrestling?  I never asked their opinion, nor do I care.

How far do you want to take your wrestling?  One match at a time.

If you could change anything about indy wrestling or how people perceive pro wrestling, what would you change and why?  I don't follow it or pay attention to it.  From some clips I see occasionally, it's basically out of shape wannabe's doing backyard wrestling.

Complete the following sentence:  If I don't make it to the WWE, I'll be happy since it was never my #1 goal.

And one more sentence:  If I wasn't a wrestler, I would be a in radio or television as a sports broadcaster.
   
 


 

Question & Answer Interview: Knight is Right
by Ashvin Kumar

Kevin Knight 

Posted: November 1, 2011 

  

I interviewed Kevin Knight at the IWF Centre for my High School project.  Kevin is a wrestler and trainer at IWF (Independent Wrestling Federation). 

When did you start training to wrestle?

It was in 1996, I was working as a radio station sportscaster and the NWA (National Wrestling Alliance) came to town and had an angle with The Iron Sheik and myself as the radio host where I was trying to swing his Persian Clubs.  So I trained from that point on.   After that, I opened the IWF to continue my training.

When did you open the IWF?

We started doing town to town live events in March of 1998, and then we opened the IWF Centre in 1999, and we've stayed here ever since.

When did you start training other wrestlers?

I opened the school in 1999 because wrestling was at an all-time high, and WrestleMania was as big as the The Super Bowl.  So I figured this could help kids with their dreams.

I know that there have been a lot of famous wrestlers who taught classes here, can you name a few?

We had Ricky Steamboat, The Honky Tonk Man, JBL, Dr. Tom Prichard and Tito Santana.  JBL and The Honky Tonk Man were amazing.

Backyard wrestling was becoming more and more popular, what did you think about it?

Kids are going to do that kind of stuff, as long as it isn't that extreme stuff, then it isn't that bad.  But a lot of it is pretty bad.

Who were your most successful students?

Darren Young who is in WWE and was in the original Nexus, Robbie E who was a TNA X-Division Champ (TNA is the second biggest wrestling company), and Flex Freeman who recently signed with the WWE.

Is there a reason the IWF Centre is in New Jersey?

Its where I live, its just easier for me.

Who were your inspirations to wrestle?

I liked Ric Flair, Hulk Hogan, Rowdy Roddy Piper, and Barry Windham.

What do you think of today’s wrestling?  Who do you think is the best wrestler today?

Its all talk and I don't watch it much because if I want to see people talk then I'll watch Jerry Springer.  I'm not really a big fan of it anymore, and when I get home the last thing I want to think about is wrestling.  But, Randy Orton is the best and I keep up with Darren Young.  I think UFC is going to replace wrestling, just like wrestling beat boxing.

So would you want to work for the WWE?

Only behind the scenes.  I don't like how it’s so scripted.  I prefer calling it in the ring and playing off the crowd’s reaction.

So what else do you think makes you successful?

You need a good look, natural talent, a good gimmick won't hurt either, and you have to have mic skills to make it today.

What are the chances of making it in the business?

I've had five hundred students and five made it big, so there is a 1 percent chance you will make it.  It took Darren Young 6 years, Rob 10 years, and Flex 11 months.

Who was your best student?

Darren Young, he was the most talented and the most dedicated.

    


Kevin Knight Interview About IWF Wrestling School Grad The Shore Robbie E
Kevin Knight

by Luke Dormehl
Fighting Spirit Magazine
www.fightingspiritmagazine.co.uk

Posted: December 19, 2010

          

When did you start working as a trainer?

I started as a trainer when the doors to IWF Wrestling Training School | New Jersey opened 11 years ago in December 1999.  I really wanted to learn as much as possible about the business, inside and outside of the ring.  Even though I was the trainer, I always considered myself a student.  My training I received stunk, as the "schools" that were around then in the late 1990's were a disaster.  I dreamed of opening a school to learn, more so than teach.  I brought in WWE superstars and legends like Honky Tonk Man, Tom Prichard, Tito Santana from day one to help teach me and the students.  Since then, we've also had John Bradshaw Layfield, Young Stallion Jimmy Powers, Ken Shamrock and Ricky Steamboat.  I knew with the knowledge I received from these legends would provide a recipe for success for those who wanted to achieve greatness.

Who else have you trained?

Over the past 11 years, IWF Wrestling School has seen a few top graduates sign with major professional wrestling organizations.  In addition to Robbie E, I have trained WWE Raw Superstar Darren Young.  Also Fady The Arabian Bull, known as Fahd Rakman in FCW.  And former WWE diva Dawn Marie.  Dawn trained to learn wrestling skills after she was a valet in the original ECW.

What are the things you emphasize as a teacher?

Be on time, stay in shape, work hard, and if you don't have a passion for professional wrestling then you need to find something else to do with your spare time.  It's all about desire, dedication, and hard work.  If you don't have a true passion for this, you will fail.

When did you first meet Rob?

I believe I first met Rob in early 1999, as he used to attend IWF Live Events that were held in Central New Jersey at the time.   When IWF Wrestling School opened in December 1999 in Northern New Jersey, he was one of the first people to inquire about the school.  I think he was our first email.  He was only 16 at the time, and began training in June 2000 at the conclusion of his junior year in high school. 

What were your first impressions of him?

Rob was determined from day one to achieve success.  That's what I remember most vividly.  From finding a way to attend IWF Live Events at the age of 15, to being one of the first people to call the wrestling school, to finding a way to car-pool to the school three to four days a week when he was only 16.  

Did he pick things up quickly in training?

Yes he did, he was a natural from day one.  In his class were fellow stand-outs Damian Adams and Josh Daniels.  They all started at the same time in June 2000.  He was in good company.  They all graduated IWF Wrestling School together and have held many IWF championship titles. 

He’s a charismatic guy. Was that always evident?

Yes.  In wrestling, you either have it, or you don't.  He had it.  In-ring skills, speaking skills, a good look.  Our fans loved him from day one.   

Did you help him develop his character (what was his initial gimmick?)

The students and graduates at IWF Wrestling School basically come up with everything themselves.  It's our own personalities turned up on full blast. You have to be comfortable as yourself first.    

Can you talk about (err, write about) your first match with Rob in IWF?

Well, I wrestled against Rob many, many times in class at IWF Wrestling School.  I think I wrestled Rob for the first time on an IWF Live Event in 2001.  We did a few singles matches and a few tag team matches.  I don't remember specifics, but he was always very easy to wrestle, a pleasure to work with, and always made me look good haha.   

What do you think his main talents are?

Rob can do it all.  Mat wrestling, technical wrestling, aerial wrestling, speaking skills.  He is the complete package. 

Have you worked much with Becky Bayless?

No I have not. 

Were you familiar with the Jersey Shore program that Rob’s gimmick is based on?

Yes, I saw all the highlights and heard about all the hype.  But I never watched a full episode, I couldn't take it any longer after 5 minutes.  Rob does look like he would fit right in, but he is far more intelligent than all of those "actors" combined, which is why when the Jersey Shore TV program ends, Rob will continue to succeed for years to come.    

How do you feel his TNA run is going?

I finally had a chance to catch up and watch most of his matches and interviews on the Internet.  He is getting quality TV time for interviews and for his matches.  You can't ask for much more than that.   I'd say so far, so good.

Do you think TNA will use the character to its full potential?

So far they have.  He is the X-Division Champion already.  A great honor after only a few months after his debut.  They are giving him a chance to shine.  He will take the ball and run with it. 

Do you have any predictions for Rob’s future career?

Rob will go as far as he wants.  He works hard, studies his craft, knows the business inside and out, and he will make some noise for a long time to come.  I am very proud of him and wish him continued success.
   
 

Kevin Knight

Kevin Knight - Squashberry Interview

by Anthony Lora

Produced: November 18, 2010 

It is often said that the wrestling business is perhaps the hardest profession to find substantial success particularly when it relates to operating a respectable training facility where most fall victim to the phrase: "Here today and gone tomorrow."  However, joining me at this moment is Kevin Knight, founder of Camp IWF to briefly discuss his involvement  with one of northern New Jersey’s best training ground on Spotlight 7!

1) 11 years ago the birth of Camp IWF came to fruition. What were your initial thoughts the minute you decided to open the doors of this school of hard drops? (to sort of innovate a phrase)

The doors opened in December 1999, and my original thoughts were for me to learn as much as possible and make the school the best it would be.  My training I received stunk, as the "schools" that were around then in the late 1990's were inept, dirty, unprofessional, and run by "used car salesman" type people.  I dreamed of opening a school to learn, not to teach.  I brought in WWE superstars and legends like Honky Tonk Man, Dr. Tom Prichard, Tito Santana from day one to help teach me and the students.  Since then, we've also had John Bradshaw Layfield, Young Stallion Jim Powers, Ken Shamrock and Ricky Steamboat.  I knew with the knowledge I received from these legends that I could run a better school than anyone else, provide a recipe for success for those who wanted to achieve greatness.

2) On that note, given the school’s geographical location, do you feel you are at an advantage or disadvantage?

I'd say we are at an advantage.  Being in Northern New Jersey, we are close to all the major highways that link us to NYC, Eastern PA, Southern CT.   And just 30 minutes from Newark Airport.  Overall, we have had students from 20 states including Alabama, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. 

3) What are the benefits of being a wrestling school that also runs monthly functions including the yearly teen camp and as opposed to just strictly running a school?

We are all things wrestling. Our Youth Clinics, which we do every July, August, October, November and December are a great two-day session where kids between the ages of 12 to 17 can live out their dream and have an opportunity to step inside a ring and have some fun.  I began IWF Youth Wrestling Clinics in 2001 to safely show kids some moves and holds in a friendly-environment.  IWF Monthly Live Events have six or seven matches, two hours of non-stop wrestling action, and we blind you with our light and laser display to help enhance the persona's of the wrestlers.  We use more fog than a cemetery on Halloween, and we will dazzle you with our video screen.  Myself and the IWF try to give our students and fans an "experience" they will never forget.  We also host kids Birthday Parties as well.

4) Camp IWF is the institute responsible for furthering the careers of former independent wrestling stars such as Fred Sampson who now wrestles as Darren Young in the WWE. Two other IWF regulars who are also experiencing significant transitions in their careers, I am referring to both Rob Eckos (see: TNA’s Robbie E) and Fady The “Arabian Bull” (currently signed to a WWE developmental deal).  Would you say that the “winners train and losers explain” mentality played a major role in their success ? Or was it the effective combination of talent and timing?

It's a combination of both. Most people make excuses, and that's not just in wrestling.  In the end, you either have what you want, or the excuses as to why you don't.  Over the past 11 years, IWF Wrestling School has seen 5 of our top graduates sign with major professional wrestling organizations.  When Darren Young entered the School in 2002, I pretty much knew that if he worked hard and stuck with it, that he would make it to the top.  He was a fast learner and just had "it" which is one-in-a-million.  With Fady The Arabian Bull, now known as Fahd Rakman in FCW, it took him a little longer to pick things.  He started in 2007, but things clicked at the beginning of 2010.  The Shore Robbie E in TNA also graduated from IWF School, as did former WWE diva Dawn Marie.  Robbie has tremendous skills, and Dawn trained to learn wrestling skills after she was a valet in the original ECW.

5) I may be wandering off a bit into politics and with good reason. The very same town in which you operate your training facility has received a gimmick change not too long ago from being known as West Paterson to Woodland Park. (sounds like a heel turn to me-lol ) How did this change of name effect you in any way?

They wanted to change the name of the town from West Paterson to Woodland Park for at least the past 20 years.  They finally changed it to Woodland Park at the November 2008 election, and then they had a vote to change it back to West Paterson in November 2009, but it lost by only a few votes.  So its now officially Woodland Park, but everyone still calls it West Paterson.  It makes no difference to IWF.

6) One interesting fact that sets Camp IWF apart from other pro-wrestling schools is the fact that you have yearly wrestling clinics conducted by well- established veteran wrestlers. Do they sometimes serve as talent scouts for the day?

Yes, IWF hosts Seminars and Clinics with stars and legends.  John Bradshaw Layfield, Hall of Famer Tito Santana, former Intercontinental Champion Honky Tonk Man, WWE developmental coach Dr. Tom Prichard, Young Stallion Jim Powers, Hall of Famer Ricky Steamboat, former UFC Champion Ken Shamrock, Stevie Richards, Nunzio, and Dawn Marie hosted clinics.  Some have made recommendations.  22 home-grown talents worked with WWE, including Darren Young, Fady the Bull, Dawn Marie, Vladimir Kozlov, Rich Ross, Damian Adams, Robbie E, Travis Blake, Chris Steeler, Justin Corino, Aaron Stride and others. 

7) I am aware that you will be hosting a diva/manager/referee contest this coming Sunday November 21, 2010. Details please?
 
It's a once-in-a-lifetime chance for fans and aspiring superstars to enter a ring and win 6-weeks of FREE Pro Wrestling Training at IWF School!  Its a one-day instructional class that provides adults an exciting opportunity to enter the ring and experience the training methods of a manager, diva, and referee.  The participants will have fun and learn basic skills and speaking techniques.  Wrestling needs the next Bobby the Brain Heenan, Paul Bearer and Sensational Sherri!

      


 

Kevin Knight

Interview with Kevin Knight - courtesy www.FromTheRing.com

Posted: October 22, 2010 

Kevin Knight knows the wrestling business. Almost a 15 year veteran in the business, Kevin Knight owns the Independent Wrestling Federation in New Jersey. Since its inception, the IWF has proven to be one of the premier training facilities and live event spectacles on the east coast. Luckily, From The Ring was able to catch up with Kevin.

 1.) Since 1999, IWF has built itself from the ground up to become one of the most reputable professional wrestling schools in the northeast.  From talent like Fady The Arabian Bull to WWE Superstar Darren Young, you've had a lot of talent emerge as of late.  As the head trainer, how do you view the success of these wrestlers?
  
Yes, over the past 11 years, IWF Wrestling School has seen 5 of our top graduates sign with major professional wrestling organizations.  When Darren Young entered the School in 2002, I pretty much knew that if he worked hard and stuck with it, that he would make it to the top.  He was a fast learner and just had "it" which is one-in-a-million.  With Fady The Arabian Bull, now known as Fahd Rakman in FCW, it took him a little longer to pick things.  He started in 2007, but things clicked at the beginning of 2010 and overnight, he developed "it" which is now two-in-a-million haha.  I have no doubt that someday they will both participate at a WrestleMania very soon.  The Shore Robbie E in TNA also graduated from IWF School, as did former WWE diva Dawn Marie.  Robbie has tremendous skills, and Dawn trained to learn wrestling skills after she was a valet in the original ECW.


2.) IWF runs every month in West Paterson, New Jersey with exciting live events.  What do you consider unique about the IWF experience and what has been a key to the promotions longevity?
  
IWF presents wrestling different than on today's "TV" wrestling shows.  We actually wrestle.  Less talking.  That's unique now-a-days.  We have guys and gals with compelling, well-defined persona's.  We don't insult the intelligence of our fans by calling our wrestlers and athletes "entertainers."  I remember what I liked as a kid and young adult watching wrestling and going to local live events, so I now try to give those feelings I got as a fan to the people who now attend IWF events.  


3.) You're almost a 15 year veteran in the world of professional wrestling.  Are you pleased with what you've been able to accomplish so far?
  
Yes, I am pleased.  I have nothing left to accomplish, and I have nothing left to prove.  About 15 to 20 other wrestling "schools" in the Northeast have closed their doors during the time we have been open.  They were a joke.  There was one "school" that opened in 2001 right down the street from us that literally was open for 2 months, and was a disaster.  They had so-called "big names" as "trainers" haha.  They were out of business quicker than a John Cena movie out of theatres. Why?  They were unintelligent, disorganized, couldn't promote, had a dirty facility.  It's not who you are, it's how hard you work and how you present yourself. 

4.) What are some of your future goals that you've set for yourself and IWF?
  
To keep doing what we are doing as long as I have a passion for it.  Change and adapt with the times.  Keep on improving myself and the IWF day by day.

5.) Having visited IWF and having partaken in one of the youth training clinics, I'd have to say that it’s one of the greatest experiences for teens looking to experience a taste of what professional wrestling is all about.  What do you think makes these programs special and how important is it to teach teens both the dangers and wonders of professional wrestling?
  
Our Youth Clinics, which we do every July, August, October and December are a great two-day session where kids between the ages of 12 to 17 can live out their dream and have an opportunity to step inside a ring and have some fun.  I remember when I was 12 years-old, a washed-up has-been wrestler named Larry Sharpe wouldn't let me get into the ring he was taking down at the Meadowlands NJ Arena after a NWA-AWA card.  He was rude to children.  Funny, here we are in 2010 and his "school" has been long sent out to pasture, and I began IWF Youth Wrestling Clinics in 2001 to safely show kids some moves and holds in a friendly-environment, and I also allow any kid that comes to an IWF Live Event to come into the ring after my matches.  Myself and the IWF try to give our students and fans an "experience" they will never forget.  We get it.  Other's don't.

6.) When you first broke into the business, what were some of your original aspirations?  Did you ever dream about opening your own wrestling school and promotion?
  
My original aspirations were to learn as much as possible and be the best I could be.  Not to compare myself to others, or try to reach levels of others.  My training stunk, the "schools" that were around then in 1996-97 were inept, dirty, unprofessional, and run by used car salesman.  I dreamed of opening a school to learn, not to teach.  I brought in WWE superstars and legends like Honky Tonk Man, Dr. Tom Prichard, Tito Santana from day one to help teach me and the students.  I knew with the knowledge I received from these legends that I could run a better school than anyone else, provide a recipe for success for those who wanted to achieve greatness, and run better events than anyone else.  I knew I could do it, but it took time.

7.) Do you believe that MMA is competition for professional wrestling? How much of the professional wrestling market do you believe are also MMA fans?
  
Yes, it sure is competition.  But it's a different fan base.  Adult men in the key demographic between the ages of 18 to 34 are watching MMA and UFC, and not WWE or TNA.  They wouldn't be caught dead watching 63 year-old Ric Flair, or crippled Hulk Hogan, or a ridiculous midget like Hornswaggle.  WWE and TNA refuse to admit UFC is competition.  Now, it's not competition per-say like Coke is to Pepsi as a product, but they are competition as far as vying for the same audience.  I see TapouT and Affliction shirts EVERYWHERE I go.  I do not see anyone over the age of 12 or 13 wearing a wrestling shirt anymore, anywhere.  Its not cool.

8.) What are your views on the current state of professional wrestling? With IWF having a family friendly product, do you believe that more professional wrestling companies should try to tone it down or do you think there’s room for everything in professional wrestling?
  
WWE and TNA product is sub-par.  Its not cool.  Its not hip.  Its not happening.  Its not today.  Why?  They don't K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Stupid.  Wrestling is good against evil, fighting over dollars and championships.  Funny, that's what UFC is.  That's what IWF is.  What WWE and TNA needs to tone down is the lunacy and ridiculousness of their product.  TNA should be called TNT, total non-stop talking!  In 1984-85 when Hulkamania and WWF were hotter than hell, it was PG.  It should be PG.  Fathers should be able to watch wrestling with their sons.  From 1998 to 2008, they couldn't.  That generation of youngsters who are now young adults have discovered MMA and UFC.  WWE missed out on a generation of fans, as proved by the fact that TV ratings and PPV numbers and Event attendance are horribly at record lows. 

9.) Whether it be shooting a commercial for Survivor Series in 2003 to being a druid for the Undertaker, you've done a lot in your career. What would you say is the most memorable moment in your career on a personal level?
  
Wrestling at a WWE SmackDown TV event in June 2003 against A-Train in Madison Square Garden in NYC.  The match was televised.  I worked hard to get that match, I worked hard to prepare.  I got many more WWE opportunities after that match, and it kicked open a lot of doors for the IWF.

10.) Having seen the impact that concussions have on athletes, especially professional wrestlers, how important is safety to you and the IWF? Have you taken more precautions as more information about the effects of concussions has come out?
  
Safety is number one.  At this level, the wrestlers have jobs, or go to school, or have families.  We do not do any wacky flips or nonsensical dives.  They belong at a high-wire circus.  Wrestling is about the story of good against evil, two men settling their differences on the mat, or in a good old-fashioned brawl.  All these concussions, and injuries, and premature deaths mostly come as a result of the human body taking too much unnecessary punishment from flips, dives, chairs, etc.  Now, freak injuries will happen here and there, but no reason to risk your health and well-being with dangerous risk-taking.  For what?  For cheers?  Stupid. 

11.) Lastly, what can a fan going to an IWF show for the first time expect?
  
Six or seven matches, two hours of non-stop wrestling action, and we blind you with our light and laser display to help enhance the persona's of the wrestlers.  We use more fog than a cemetery on Halloween, and we will dazzle you with our video screen. 
  

   

Kevin Knight Interview from "Hit the Ropes" Radio Show

Posted: October 20, 2010

       

Listen to the Hit the Ropes Radio podcast interview as Kevin Kngiht talks Evil Intentions, IWF Wrestling School, IWF Grads Darren Young, Fady The Arabian Bull, The Shore Robbie E. and more!

    


 

Kevin Knight

Interview with Kevin Knight (January 2010)
by: Jerry Wiseman

Columbus Pro Wrestling Examiner


1. Your dream opponent would be?

There are two, and I've been lucky enough to wrestle them many times before, and that's WWE Hall of Famer Tito Santana and WWE Legend Honky Tonk Man. They both serve as guest instructors at IWF Pro Wrestling School in West Paterson, NJ, and have wrestled on many Independent Wrestling Federation live events.

2. What is your best road story?

Anytime traveling with WWE Legend Honky Tonk Man. Just listening to his stories hours on-end are priceless.

3. Who is someone you always like to watch wrestle?

Currently its Randy Orton, Shawn Michaels, Triple H, Undertaker, Chris Jericho, Big Show, and Edge. In days gone by, Ted DiBiase, Jake Roberts, Ric Flair, The Horsemen, Roddy Piper, Hulk Hogan.

4. As a promoter who would be in your money match?

Hulk Hogan versus Stone Cold Steve Austin.

5. Do you think tag team wrestling is a lost art?

Yes. It's not easy to do and you have guys in wrestling who don't belong and who don't understand how to do it. As a kid, I loved tag team matches. It was the best part of the show usually. Now, when there are tag team matches on TV, it's usually with main event singles wrestlers teaming up, and not permanent teams.

6. If you got the call from New York, would you change your gimmick and to what?

Haha they would change it for me, and tell me what to do and tell me what to say. But that's not for me.

7. Do you think titles need to mean something again?

Yes, I couldn't even tell you who any of the current champions are in WWE, how does one organization have two separate heavyweight champions? There's a Monday night champion, a Tuesday night champion, a Friday night champion. It's like boxing, too many titles, too many initials, too much confusion. And I don't watch TNA. Do they even have titles there?

8. You own a promotion, who are the first five workers you hire?

Well, I would start from within with guys we already have or who have graduated from IWF Wrestling School. That would be Fred Sampson who is now in FCW, Damian Adams, Chris Steeler, and myself (and since you said hire, does that mean I finally get paid?). The fifth would be WWE Legend Young Stallion Jim Powers, who now serves as guest instructor at IWF Wrestling School and who wrestles on IWF Live Events. You need a mentor like him who is a solid veteran to help with the foundation.

9. What is the craziest match you have done?

A Ladder Match with Eliminator John Kronus of ECW fame back in 1999. I escaped alive, that's all I remember.

10. Do you prefer hardcore, traditional or a mix of the two for your own matches?

Traditional, as it is the only style that holds up over time.

11. Besides yourself, who is the best to ever step into the ring?

Ric Flair and Hulk Hogan. In my eyes, its a tie.

12. Who is your favorite opponent?

IWF Heavyweight Champion Hi-Definition Chris Steeler.

13. If you could change one thing about the business, what would it be?

I would not allow a microphone near the ring. Less talking.

14. Does wrestling need a union?

Yes, at the major league level, WWE and TNA. The guy who sweeps up Madison Square Garden after the wrestling show has more benefits and gets more rights than the guys who actually wrestled that night in front of 20,000 people.

15. What drew you into the business?

Watching guys like Hulk Hogan, Roddy Piper and Ric Flair do their thing in the 1980's.

16. Do you think good and evil characters need to be clearly defined again?

Yes, they are in WWE. Can't speak for TNA. I watched them once, couldn't follow it, and won't watch it again.

17. In the annals of wrestling, what do you want to be said about you?

I was a complete pain in the ass. And because of that, IWF Pro Wrestling School is one of the best training facilities in the Country.

18. What decade, the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s or 00s do you think best defined wrestling?

1980's.

19. Do you think Internet PPVs would help indie promotions?

Enough PPV's already. Indies should showcase their stuff free online and get themselves "out there".

20. What is one thing you want fans to know about.

You can check out the Independent Wrestling Federation by visiting our web site at www.WrestlingIWF.com.

      


Kevin Knight

Kevin Knight Interview (Dec 2009):
by Derek Pivko

Staff Writer, WrestlingIWF.com
Contributor, NHL.com

Posted: December 15, 2009

1) How was IWF formed? How did you become involved in IWF?

IWF was formed in early 1998, and the first live event was held March 14, 1998 in Nutley, NJ. I had been wrestling for two years prior, and was amazed at how inept most of the organizations were that I wrestled for. I sat back at watched everything they did wrong, and learned from their mistakes. At the same time, I learned from the mistakes I made in the ring. With the IWF, we wanted to take wrestling back to the old-school, family-friendly style, and we now begin our 13th year of producing live events. IWF Wrestling School began in December 1999, so this month of December 2009 marks our 10th Anniversary.


2) How do you compare IWF amongst other independent promotions in the state of New Jersey?

Easy comparison. We are professional. The others are not. They are not operated by qualified individuals. Just because you can rent a building and rent a ring does not make you qualified to produce a live professional wrestling event. I have had top-notch experience in sports, entertainment, media, and marketing for 15 years. We are full-time, every week, every month, year-round. And these other groups have "wrestlers" in the ring who are not qualified. Just because you slip a promoter $50 and put on a pair of jeans and a sweatshirt and work-boots and you hop in the ring and play around for 10 minutes does not make you a professional wrestler. Our wrestlers are highly trained, in shape, have great personas, look the part, and are professionals. Once an IWF student or graduate does not live up to those standards, they are out the door. We want professionals, not weekend warriors.


3) You have had several wrestling clinics involving past WWE superstars. Which wrestler was the most influential during the clinic and why?

I'll narrow it down to four because I can't just pick one. The clinics we have had with WWE Legend Honky Tonk Man, WWE Developmental Talent Trainer Dr. Tom Prichard, WWE Hall of Famer Tito Santana, and former WWE Champion John Bradshaw Layfield were the most influential. From them, I learned how to teach, and the IWF students and graduates learned how to be better wrestlers and performers. They showed us how to act inside and outside of the ring. We follow their game-plan for our live events and the school. The learning never ends.


4) What would you be doing if you weren't involved in IWF?

Probably play-by-play sports announcing for a professional team, or radio broadcasting. I went to college for radio and television. But I can still do that when wrestling ends. There really was no second option besides IWF. I wasn't going to fail. That's all I ever wanted to do. And here we are 13 years later.


5) What are your goals for the next 10 years?

To keep improving IWF Live Events, keep improving IWF Wrestling School, keep improving the skills of our students and graduates, and keep improving my wrestling and teaching abilities. With hard work, desire, and dedication, the sky is the limit, and all goals will be reached.


6) Which wrestlers did you admire growing up?

I loved watching Rowdy Roddy Piper, Ric Flair, Bobby Heenan, Jake Roberts, Ted DiBiase, Honky Tonk Man, and The Four Horseman. I just loved the way they got under the skin of the fans.


7) How did IWF become known through the media. Your promotion has appeared on several news networks, newspapers, etc.

When you are the best at what you do, people take notice. We have the best Wrestling School in the Northeast, and we produce the best family-friendly Live Events in the Northeast. We have been featured on every local TV outlet and national cable channel. Our wrestlers have been featured in almost every daily and weekly newspaper in the state.


8) How many hours a week are you at IWF?

Honestly, I never count. If you enjoy what you do, you will never work a day in your life. So I don't log the hours. In addition to our 2 monthly live events, we host children’s birthday parties and provide them with a live event, so we run about 8-10 live events per month, and we have wrestling school class 3 days a week.


9) How has wrestling changed due to the internet?

I honesty don't follow wrestling on the internet. I have a life haha. My existence does not revolve around backstage wrestling news. I barely watch wrestling on TV. I don't want to follow any internet trends or copy anything else. The internet is so over-rated as far as wrestling is concerned. The same people who claim to "be in the know" because they read internet wrestling rumors are the same people who yell and scream when Hulk Hogan puts his hand up to his ear.

        


      
     

Kevin Knight on Sirius XMKevin Knight on Sirius XMKevin Knight on Sirius XM
 
Interview from "Busted Open" Radio Show on November 20, 2009